Simple sewing – Infinity Scarf

Please forgive the photos in this post – I was scrambling back and forth with the camera on timer so that I could focus on each infinity scarf, then run and be IN the shot.  It didn’t work out that well for me.  Add to that a triple double+ chin and post yoga workout gear and it was destined to be a bad shoot – but that doesn’t mean the project itself is bad.

Nope, this is an easy-peasy sewing project that you can whip out in about 15 minutes.

Infinity scarves! (or infinity scarf if you only make one).

You’re going to see lots of tutorials on how to make these online, but what you won’t see is a comparison – that’s the perk of having me test things out first.  (versus learn the hard way)

This first photo is of an infinity scarf I made using the measurements 60″ long by 30″ wide.  It’s cute, it wraps twice and it fits, but if you’re like me and find this a bit confining, then you’ll want to see the second image…

infinity scarf 7

Which uses the measurements 70″ by 30″.  The extra 10″ of length lets your scarf hang a bit lower and while it won’t keep your neck as warm, will stop you from feeling claustrophobic.

DIY Infinity Scarf

Just a matter of personal taste – I made several of both to give as gifts for Christmas.

So the instructions – given the measurements above for longer (70″ x 30″) versus standard (60″ by 30″).  You’ll want to get a nice brushed flannel – one where the pattern goes all the way through the fabric.  (Some flannels have patterns on one side only)

I made a couple of these scarves with a minky lining, so I used 60″ in length by 15″ wide of the plaid flannel and 15″ width of the minky.

Put right sides together and sew – starting 2″ (10cm) in from one end and ending 2″ in from the other end.  If using one solid piece of fabric, this is all you’ll need to do.  If using two pieces, like here, you’ll need to sew the entire other edge from end to end.  Do a zig zag stitch to reinforce the seam and stop the flannel from fraying.

DIY Infinity Scarf

Turn right sides out – you can see below how I stopped short of reaching the ends.

DIY Infinity Scarf

This part is difficult to photograph, but hopefully my words make sense – place the right sides of the ends of the fabric together.  Your scarf is still right-sides-out, but you will want to sort of half turn it so that you can make a complete ring of right-sides-together on the ends.

DIY Infinity Scarf

This makes an awkward tulip sort of shape, so pin it together to hold it in place.  Sew from end to end leaving a 1/2″ seam allowance.  Reinforce to stop fraying.

DIY Infinity Scarf

Turn this section right-side-out through the little 2″ (which is really 4″ because both are together now) section.  Fold the hem inwards and then top stitch as close to the seam as you can.

DIY Infinity Scarf

Hopefully my wording didn’t make this needlessly confusing – it really is simple and if you can sew a straight line, you can make one of these in about 15 minutes.

Proof – I went a little crazy and made several infinity scarves to give as Christmas gifts this year:

DIY Infinity Scarf infinity scarf 7 infinity scarf 11

DIY Infinity Scarf

(This is a smaller infinity scarf that I just tucked one end through the other – just for a bit of a different look.)

DIY Infinity Scarf

A dozen to be exact… actually, make that 14 since I made two smaller minky ones for the girls as well.

DIY Infinity Scarf

I’m going to guesstimate here and say that each scarf came in at less than $7 each.

I made up a few gift tags:

DIY Infinity Scarf

and I’m all set to wrap them up and keep someone I love warm and cozy.

infinity scarf 14

Here’s the quick-pin if you want to save it for later:

Infinity scarf P

 

Have a great one!

Linked to:

2018-06-18T13:41:27-04:00November 24th, 2015|CRAFTS, EASY SEWING, GIFTS|2 Comments

2 Comments

  1. Emily Marie from A Pop of Red November 25, 2015 at 9:42 pm - Reply

    Love infinity scarves! Such an easy project and great for those learning to sew. I added two to gift baskets this year for my family members.

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: