Building plans for a table saw stand

The other day I told you how my old Craftsman table saw died mid-project and I had to fork out the big buckers for a new table saw.

Well…  as it turns out, table saws (with a table attached) are almost twice the price of “job site” table saws (those with no table attached).  We’re talking a $429 portable job site table saw versus a $799 one with a stand.  That’s hefty for what is basically the same saw.

I did a bit of research online and through Consumer Reports and decided to go with a DeWalt DWE7480 10″ Compact job Site table saw with Pro-modular guarding system. Fairly priced and one of the highest rated table saws.  I’ve used it a few times and let me tell you, it is table saw LOVE over here.  (affiliate link – see disclosure at bottom)

The downside is that without an actual stand for it, I have to cut my wood on the ground and it just doesn’t feel safe.

I surfed for table saw plans online and came across a build by Nikki @grainsofgrace.stl on Instagram.  She very generously shared her plans with me and I modified them to create a smaller version of her table saw stand.

Building plans for a table saw stand, table saw station, table saw bench, table saw workbench

I bought (6) 2x4x8 boards and one sheet of 3/4″ mdf for my build.  You’ll also want (4) 2″ locking castors.

Table saw stand

Cuts:

  • (4) 2×4 at 35 ¼”
  • (2) 2×4 at 22 ¼”
  • (4) 2×4 at 21 ½”
  • (4) 2×4 at 23″
  • (6) 2×4 at 17″
  • have your home improvement store cut your ¾” mdf into 24″ strips

I made all of my cuts on my mitre saw and then pre-drilled pocket holes on the 21 ½”, 23″ and 17″ boards.

Building plans for a table saw stand, table saw station, table saw bench, table saw workbench

(I drilled the 22 1/4″ boards in error)

Using wood glue and 2 ½” pocket screws create two rectangles from your 35 ¼” and 23″ boards – check for square with a speed square.


Building plans for a table saw stand, table saw station, table saw bench, table saw workbench

Attach the two rectangles together with wood glue, 2 ½” pocket screws and your 17″ boards – top and one bottom.  (let it be said now – ALWAYS check for square)

Building plans for a table saw stand, table saw station, table saw bench, table saw workbench

This is the upper level of your table saw stand, now you will attach the lower level which will hold the table saw itself.

To the bottom of your frame, attach your 21 ½” boards with wood glue and 2 ½” pocket screws.

Continue building your frame for both sides before bringing in your 17″ boards to connect everything.

Building plans for a table saw stand, table saw station, table saw bench, table saw workbench

Below is a view of my table saw stand tipped on its side.

Building plans for a table saw stand, table saw station, table saw bench, table saw workbench

Once your framework is complete, attach your locking castors with 2 ½” construction screws for rigidity.

Building plans for a table saw stand, table saw station, table saw bench, table saw workbench

Lift your table saw stand to upright.

Building plans for a table saw stand, table saw station, table saw bench, table saw workbench

The top sections of your table saw stand will be cut from the 24″ mdf boards – one 23″ long and the other 26″ long.  I used my new table saw to help build the new table saw stand – I feel like I should sing Alannis Morrissette’s “Ironic” here.  I attached the tops with 2″ deck screws.

Building plans for a table saw stand, table saw station, table saw bench, table saw workbench

I’ve checked and re-checked and my building plans for a table saw stand are accurate – BUT, once I assembled mine I found that I had a 1/8″ difference between the table top of the saw and the top-level of the stand.  At this point, any wood that I slide over my table saw will bump against the top-level of the stand and that can be both annoying and dangerous.  To make up for this 1/8″ builder’s error (not building plan error), I added a shim underneath the mdf board on the table saw level.  Now it’s perfect and safe.

Building plans for a table saw stand, table saw station, table saw bench, table saw workbench

Attach your lower shelf pieces by pre-cutting notches in your mdf boards for the 2×4’s.  I took a scrap piece of 2×4 and traced it onto each corner and then cut with a jig saw.  Screw into place with 2″ wood screws.

The shelving section of the building plans for a table saw stand are left up to you.  Do you have large tools you want to store underneath like a drill press or a planer?

(Forgive the wavy-ness of my photo; the table saw stand is straight, my garage is straight, but my driveway looks like a day at the beach.  We seriously need this re-laid.)

Building plans for a table saw stand, table saw station, table saw bench, table saw workbench

Yes, I painted my table saw stand in a matte black – 1. because I had the paint and 2. to make it more badass. lol

The larger opening underneath the stand is also roomy enough to fit a shop vac which you can attach to the back of your table saw itself.

Building plans for a table saw stand, table saw station, table saw bench, table saw workbench

Building plans for a table saw stand, table saw station, table saw bench, table saw workbench

I added a simple shelf underneath the table saw using bits of scrap wood with mdf laid over.

I didn’t glue these in place so that I can change them down the road if I need more or less space.

Building plans for a table saw stand, table saw station, table saw bench, table saw workbench

I also added a piece of mdf to back the lower shelves to keep some of the sawdust from getting in.

Building plans for a table saw stand, table saw station, table saw bench, table saw workbench

Building plans for a table saw stand, table saw station, table saw bench, table saw workbench

The black box is actually just a cardboard Amazon box that I painted black.  Nothing fancy, but I wanted it to be consistent with my badass table saw stand.  In it I keep my safety cover, push stick, GRR-RIPPER 3D Pushblock, safety glasses and ear protection.

I don’t have a use for the bottom shelf just yet, but I know I’ll fill it.

Building plans for a table saw stand, table saw station, table saw bench, table saw workbench

The back section would also be great with pegboard inserted that you could hang tools and/or blades on.

The saw is spectacular and now it has a spectacular (and portable) home in my she-shop!

Save this for later:

Building plans for a table saw stand, table saw station, table saw bench, table saw workbench

*Note: you may need to adjust the height of the lower section of this portable table saw stand to fit other brands/makes of table saws.  The DeWalt DWE7480 is 13 1/4″ from bottom to table height.

I’d better go paint my workbench now so that is equally as badass.

Have a great one!

 

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2018-06-18T13:38:20+00:00June 1st, 2018|BUILD IT, DIY|5 Comments

5 Comments

  1. Sean July 12, 2018 at 10:32 am - Reply

    I hope this sounds more constructive than critical. You should have followed the Nikki’s original plans closer. In an effort to simplify her plans, you lost a lot of strength a workbench should have. It had 2x4s on edge with plywood on top of the base to create a torsion box for the base of the bench. Your plan is very weak on the middle and is already visibly sagging in your pictures. Not to mention the four 2x4s meeting at one point in the middle of the bottom is very poor woodworking technique you should not be teaching people. You should fix this plan or take it down. Don’t make woodworking plans if you don’t know proper woodworking techniques. Or make friends with a local cabinet maker and coordinate your plans with them.

    • Shelly @ 100Things2Do.ca July 29, 2018 at 4:22 pm - Reply

      You’re probably right – I am a self-taught DIY blogger sharing FREE plans expecting nothing in return. My build works, is solid and stable and serves the function it was built for. Please feel free to not use my plans, I’m sorry if you felt ‘forced’. Your constructive criticism is appreciated – your bitchiness is not.

  2. […] Saw Stand free plans.Follow along at the link and build a table saw stand using these free […]

  3. Jamie October 1, 2018 at 7:24 am - Reply

    I didn’t follow the plans 100% accurately, because I don’t have a pocket hole jig. Instead, i added a couple extra boards to screw into perpendicular to the frame. It added a bit of extra weight, but this thing is solid as a rock. Appreciate the plans, even though I deviated a bit. Now I want that pocket hole jig even more!

    • Shelly @ 100Things2Do.ca October 15, 2018 at 11:53 am - Reply

      So glad you tried it and that it’s working for you! Don’t worry about a pocket-hole jig – it’s a “nice to have” but not a “need to have” and I’m sure your project is spectacular without it! Thanks for commenting!

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